Tumblelog by Soup.io
Newer posts are loading.
You are at the newest post.
Click here to check if anything new just came in.

July 17 2014

16:32

Cambridge team breaks superconductor world record

Cambridge team breaks superconductor world record

New record for a trapped field in a superconductor, beating a record that has stood for more than a decade, could herald the arrival of materials in a broad range of fields

A world record that has stood for more than a decade has been broken by a team led by University of Cambridge engineers, harnessing the equivalent of three tonnes of force inside a golf ball-sized sample of material that is normally as brittle as fine china. The Cambridge researchers managed to ‘trap’ a magnetic field with a strength of 17.6 Tesla - roughly 100 times stronger than... More »

 

July 15 2014

14:46

Urban Skyfarm concept would provide inner city farming space

Urban Skyfarm concept would provide inner city farming space

Two problems caused by increasing overpopulation in cities are how to use space productively and how to feed everyone. A new concept design suggests a means of addressing both these issues. Aprilli Design Studio's Urban Skyfarm is a tree-like skyscraper that provides space for crop farming. Aprilli designed the Skyfarm with Seoul, South Korea, in mind, but it could be deployed in any... More »

 

14:44

Researchers Regrow Human Corneas: First Known Tissue Grown from a Human Stem Cell

Researchers Regrow Human Corneas: First Known Tissue Grown from a Human Stem Cell

Limbal stem cells identified with a new marker could reverse a leading cause of blindness

Boston researchers have identified a way to enhance regrowth of human corneal tissue to restore vision, using a molecule known as ABCB5 that acts as a marker for hard-to-find limbal stem cells. This work, a collaboration between the Massachusetts Eye and Ear/Schepens Eye Research Institute (Mass. Eye and Ear), Boston Children’s Hospital, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the VA Boston... More »

 

14:41

A step closer to bio-printing transplantable tissues and organs

A step closer to bio-printing transplantable tissues and organs

Researchers have made a giant leap towards the goal of 'bio-printing' transplantable tissues and organs for people affected by major diseases and trauma injuries, a new study reports. Scientists from the Universities of Sydney, Harvard, Stanford and MIT have bio-printed artificial vascular networks mimicking the body's circulatory system that are necessary for growing large complex... More »

 

July 11 2014

13:07

'MacGyver' Robots Use Their Environment to Solve Problems

'MacGyver' Robots Use Their Environment to Solve Problems

MacGyver could make a rocket-powered harpoon gun/zip line out of some moth balls, cleaning fluid, rope, pulley, and an old telescope. Robots can't do that. But hey, neither can you. What you can do is use objects in your environment to help you complete tasks that you wouldn't otherwise be able to do on your own, and robots are learning how to do the same thing. Yes, this means that soon... More »

 

June 30 2014

11:42

100% Renewable Electricity Will Be Achieved In German State Soon

100% Renewable Electricity Will Be Achieved In German State Soon

From Clean Technica website (Jake Richardson): Germany’s windiest area, Schleswig-Holstein, will probably achieve “100% renewable electricity” sometime this year. That is, its clean energy production will be able to supply all of its electricity consumption. Schleswig-Holstein has a goal to generate 300% of its electricity consumption with renewables eventually. This mostly rural... More »

 

11:38

Swarm of Tiny 'Minibuilder' Robots Can 3D Print Giant Buildings On-Site

Swarm of Tiny 'Minibuilder' Robots Can 3D Print Giant Buildings On-Site

Although the advent of 3D printing is blazing trails in the world of design, the requirement for 3D printers to be larger than the objects they produce presents a major constraint - particularly in architecture. However an innovative new project called Minibuilders is poised to push past that limitation and revolutionize the construction industry. Developed by researchers at the Institute for... More »

 

11:33

3D-printed composite is lighter than wood and stiffer than concrete

3D-printed composite is lighter than wood and stiffer than concrete

In wind farms across North America and Europe, sleek turbines equipped with state-of-the-art technology convert wind energy into electric power. But tucked inside the blades of these feats of modern engineering is a decidedly low-tech core material: balsa wood. Like other manufactured products that use sandwich panel construction to achieve a combination of light weight and strength,... More »

 

11:32

USC Scientists Create New Battery That’s Cheap, Clean, Rechargeable… and Organic

USC Scientists Create New Battery That’s Cheap, Clean, Rechargeable… and Organic

Scientists at USC have developed a water-based organic battery that is long lasting, built from cheap, eco-friendly components. The new battery – which uses no metals or toxic materials – is intended for use in power plants, where it can make the energy grid more resilient and efficient by creating a large-scale means to store energy for use as needed. “The batteries last for... More »

 

June 26 2014

16:03

New Device Allows Brain To Bypass Spinal Cord, Move Paralyzed Limbs

New Device Allows Brain To Bypass Spinal Cord, Move Paralyzed Limbs

For the first time ever, a paralyzed man can move his fingers and hand with his own thoughts thanks to an innovative partnership between The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and Battelle. Ian Burkhart, a 23-year-old quadriplegic from Dublin, Ohio, is the first patient to use Neurobridge, an electronic neural bypass for spinal cord injuries that reconnects the brain directly to... More »

 

16:00

NASA Aeronautics Makes Strides to Bring Back Supersonic Passenger Travel

NASA Aeronautics Makes Strides to Bring Back Supersonic Passenger Travel

The return of supersonic passenger travel may be coming closer to reality thanks to NASA’s efforts to define a new standard for low sonic booms. Several NASA aeronautics researchers will present their work in Atlanta this week at Aviation 2014, an annual event of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. They will share with the global aviation community the progress they are... More »

 

15:57

New ultrastiff, ultralight material developed

New ultrastiff, ultralight material developed

Nanostructured material based on repeating microscopic units has record-breaking stiffness at low density

What’s the difference between the Eiffel Tower and the Washington Monument? Both structures soar to impressive heights, and each was the world’s tallest building when completed. But the Washington Monument is a massive stone structure, while the Eiffel Tower achieves similar strength using a lattice of steel beams and struts that is mostly open air, gaining its strength from the... More »

 

15:56

Mobile Solar Filter System Removes Microorganisms and Pollutants

Mobile Solar Filter System Removes Microorganisms and Pollutants

Hydraulic engineer Andrea Schäfer and photovoltaics expert Bryce Richards have developed a solar filtration system to produce high-quality drinking water from polluted brackish water and tested it successfully in Tanzania. The test results are currently being analyzed at the KIT. The filter effectively separates undesired substances, bacteria, and viruses. Fluoride concentration that often is... More »

 

15:51

Australian researchers simulate a time-traveling photon

Australian researchers simulate a time-traveling photon

Lead author and PhD student Martin Ringbauer, from UQ’s School of Mathematics and Physics, said the study used photons – single particles of light – to simulate quantum particles travelling through time and study their behaviour, possibly revealing bizarre aspects of modern physics. “The question of time travel features at the interface between two of our most successful... More »

 

15:50

Study shows greater potential for solar power

Study shows greater potential for solar power

Concentrating solar power (CSP) could supply a large fraction of the power supply in a decarbonized energy system, shows a new study of the technology and its potential practical application

Concentrating solar power (CSP) could supply a substantial amount of current energy demand, according to the study published in the journal Nature Climate Change. In the Mediterranean region, for example, the study shows that a connected CSP system could provide 70-80% of current electricity demand, at no extra cost compared to gas-fired power plants. That percentage is similar to what a standard... More »

 

15:47

"Tell me Dave" robot learns simply by people talking to it

"Tell me Dave" robot learns simply by people talking to it

Many robots today are able to follow verbal instructions. However, the robot first has to be programmed with software code that allows it to respond to those instructions in some predetermined way, and that software must be added to every time the robot's task list is enhanced. Wouldn’t it be easier if we could just avoid all that messy fiddling about with software and talk to a... More »

 

June 23 2014

11:29

Robots Get Flexible and Torqued Up With Origami Wheels

Robots Get Flexible and Torqued Up With Origami Wheels

Origami, the art of folding pieces of paper to create shapes, is an appealing concept for robotics because you can transform two dimensional materials into three dimensional structures that are inherently flexible, or, as a roboticist would say, "deformable." What's more, structures that fold and unfold enable all kinds of interesting functionality that would otherwise only be... More »

 

June 17 2014

09:49

New class of nanoparticle brings cheaper, lighter solar cells outdoors

New class of nanoparticle brings cheaper, lighter solar cells outdoors

Think those flat, glassy solar panels on your neighbour’s roof are the pinnacle of solar technology? Think again. Researchers in the University of Toronto’s Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering have designed and tested a new class of solar-sensitive nanoparticle that outshines the current state of the art employing this new class of... More »

 

09:47

Researchers Use Human Stem Cells to Create Light-Sensitive Retina in a Dish

Researchers Use Human Stem Cells to Create Light-Sensitive Retina in a Dish

Using a type of human stem cell, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have created a three-dimensional complement of human retinal tissue in the laboratory, which notably includes functioning photoreceptor cells capable of responding to light, the first step in the process of converting it into visual images. “We have basically created a miniature human retina in a dish that not only has the... More »

 

09:44

19-Year-Old's Ocean Cleanup Array Could Clean Half the Pacific Garbage Patch in 10 Years, Study Shows

19-Year-Old's Ocean Cleanup Array Could Clean Half the Pacific Garbage Patch in 10 Years, Study Shows

Last year we reported on teenage inventor Boyan Slat’s plans to create an Ocean Cleanup Array that could remove 7,250,000 tons of plastic waste from the world’s oceans. His proposal for an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms received a lot of criticism – but now, just over a year later, Boyan is back with the results of a year-long investigation that... More »

 

Older posts are this way If this message doesn't go away, click anywhere on the page to continue loading posts.
Could not load more posts
Maybe Soup is currently being updated? I'll try again automatically in a few seconds...
Just a second, loading more posts...
You've reached the end.

Don't be the product, buy the product!

Schweinderl